Diet-dependent intraguild predation between the predatory mites Neoseiulus californicus and Neoseiulus cucumeris

Author(s)
D. Mendel, P. Schausberger
Abstract

Based on the hypothesis that matching diets of intraguild (IG) predator and prey indicate strong food competition and thus intensify intraguild predation (IGP) as compared to non-matching diets, we scrutinized diet-dependent mutual IGP between the predatory mites Neoseiulus cucumeris and N. californicus. Both are natural enemies of herbivorous mites and insects and used in biological control of spider mites and thrips in various agricultural crops. Both are generalist predators that may also feed on plant-derived substances such as pollen. Irrespective of diet (pollen or spider mites), N. cucumeris females had higher predation and oviposition rates and shorter attack latencies on IG prey than N. californicus. Predation rates on larvae were unaffected by diet but larvae from pollen-fed mothers were a more profitable prey than those from spider-mite fed mothers resulting in higher oviposition rates of IG predator females. Pollen-fed protonymphs were earlier attacked by IG predator females than spider-mite fed protonymphs. Spider mite-fed N. californicus females attacked protonymphs earlier than did pollen-fed N. californicus females. Overall, our study suggests that predator and prey diet may exert subtle influences on mutual IGP between bio-control agents. Matching diets did not intensify IGP between N. californicus and N. cucumeris but predator and prey diets proximately influenced IGP through changes in behaviour and/or stoichiometry.

Organisation(s)
External organisation(s)
Universität für Bodenkultur Wien
Journal
Journal of Applied Entomology
Volume
135
Pages
311-319
No. of pages
9
ISSN
0931-2048
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0418.2010.01548.x
Publication date
05-2011
Peer reviewed
Yes
Austrian Fields of Science 2012
106047 Animal ecology
Keywords
Portal url
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/en/publications/dietdependent-intraguild-predation-between-the-predatory-mites-neoseiulus-californicus-and-neoseiulus-cucumeris(5da7efda-a665-4a2f-8717-7fea486c5f28).html