Ontogenetic isolation favours sibling cannibalism in mites

Author(s)
P Schausberger
Abstract

Inclusive fitness theory suggests that cannibalistic individuals should preferentially eat unrelated prey when given a choice between related and unrelated individuals. Using the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis, I investigated whether having contact with siblings during a sensitive ontogenetic phase or not determines whether cannibalistic protonymphs tend to eat more sibling or nonsibling larvae in choice situations. Cannibals reared with siblings preferentially ate nonsibling larvae when these had been reared in a sibling group but showed no preference when the larvae had been reared in isolation. Cannibals reared in isolation showed no preference when the larvae had been reared in a sibling group and preferentially ate sibling larvae when these had been reared alone. The occurrence of preferential sibling cannibalism when both cannibal and prey had been reared in isolation suggests the use of self-referent phenotype matching to distinguish between siblings and nonsiblings. (C) 2004 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Organisation(s)
External organisation(s)
Universität für Bodenkultur Wien
Journal
Animal Behaviour
Volume
67
Pages
1031-1035
No. of pages
5
ISSN
0003-3472
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2003.10.006
Publication date
06-2004
Peer reviewed
Yes
Austrian Fields of Science 2012
106047 Animal ecology, 106051 Behavioural biology
Keywords
Portal url
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/en/publications/ontogenetic-isolation-favours-sibling-cannibalism-in-mites(6bff7bb0-da5f-462e-ba79-9835dc41df79).html