Ears and Hearing in Vertebrates

Author(s)
F. Ladich
Abstract

Abstract The ability to detect sound waves is found in all vertebrates independently of whether they inhabit land, water or soil. Fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals can utilize this sensory channel for detection of communication signals emitted in the course of various behaviors, and for the detection of acoustic information emitted by prey or predators or the environment. The hearing organs exhibit an impressive diversity in structure and function. The ears of fishes differ from tetrapods in as much as they do not possess sensory patches solely devoted to hearing. Amphibians possess at least two sensory patches for sound detection while in reptiles, birds and mammals, one sensory structure, the cochlea, has evolved. Auditory sensitivity differs widely within, and between, vertebrate classes. Sound detection bandwidth ranges from a few hundred hertz in certain fishes taxa to a few kilohertz in amphibians, reptiles and birds, and into ultrasonic regions of more than 100 kHz in mammals. Hence, a rich array of ear structures evolved to fulfill various tasks in acoustic orientation and communication.

Organisation(s)
Pages
46-53
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-809633-8.01295-4
Publication date
2019
Peer reviewed
Yes
Austrian Fields of Science 2012
106051 Behavioural biology
Keywords
Portal url
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/en/publications/ears-and-hearing-in-vertebrates(823685e3-4e61-41f4-bb92-0aed8ba79f2d).html